Devinda Subasinghe
The erstwhile swimmer Devinda Subasinghewas the first in our batch to represent Sri Lanka. Devinda first represented the country at the Indo Ceylon Swim meet held in Bombay in 1967, and later at the Indo-Sri Lanka swimming meet in 1972 in which he established a new national record in the 100m Dolphin stroke. Devinda created history in Sri Lanka when he became the first Sri Lankan to swim the 100m under a timing of one minute.
Devinda Subasinghe
After an illustrious carrier with the World Bank, Devinda went on to become Sri Lanka's ambassador to the United States and made some of the best diplomatic initiatives on behalf of the Sri Lankan government.
 
Michael Muller
Michael Muller, another versatile sportsman represented RC in Rugby and Cricket. Michael captained the college Rugby team in 1973. Later Michael represented CR & FC and Sri Lanka and was one of most relied centre three quarters of the era. Another unforgettable rugby player of this era was the full back late F.L Sourjah, whose kicking prowess is even talked
Michael Muller
of today. Sourjah met with a tragic death at a very early stage of life.
J. Amarasinghe
Jayantha Amarasinghe

One of few Royalist who continued to play cricket after leaving school was the legendary leggie Jayantha Amarasinghe. Jayantha went on to the pinnacle of Sri Lankan cricket and donned the Sri Lankan Test Cap in 1983. For a very long time he held the record of having the highest number of Sri Lankan first class wickets (over a thousand). Currently he functions as a match referee.

He even today holds the record of obtaining the highest number of wickets at a first eleven match at the Reid Avenue turf which is 9 for 40 against Nalanda. Jayantha also holds a test record of being the highest scorer going in as last man in a test debut (Sri Lanka vs New Zealand).

 
Ray De Silva
One of the most all-round sportsmen of our era was Ray De Silva. Ray won Royal College colours for athletics, cricket and rugby. Although Ray represented the school at Cricket and Rugby from the age of 15, he was unfortunate not to captain Royal in these two sports. However he captained the Athletic team and also went on to be the Head Prefect of Royal. Ray has the unique distinction of being the last Royalist to represent Sri Lankan schools at both Cricket and
Ray De Silva
Rugby. He also played Sara Trophy Cricket whilst at school representing CCC.
 
Prasantha Perera
Prasantha Perera
Soft spoken Prasantha Perera, better known as PS, was a dashing Table Tennis player who later went on to captain the college team. He was a Sri Lankan poolist in the junior category. PS was also a Badminton coloursman and a member of the senior basket ball team.
Gajan Pathmanathan
Gajan Pathmanathan the stylish stroke maker, mesmerised us at the 1971 Royal Thomian with an explosive 97 in just 110 minutes. Many of us will still remember waiting at the boundary ropes for a field invasion when Gajan would reach his hundred. Unfortunately, we were let down! Gajan has the unique distinction of being the only Sri Lankan to have played cricket for Oxford and Cambridge Universities and later Sri Lanka . As an undergraduate
Gajan Pathmanathan
he played for Oxford and subsequently during his post graduate studies he played for Cambridge . He was a ‘blue' of both universities. Incidentally, Gajan opened batting for British Combined Universities along with another Royalist in Aziz Mubarak pulverizing a mighty West Indian team lead by Sir Garfield Sobers with an opening stand of 87.
In 1972 Gajan and Ray represented Sri Lankan Schools against the visiting Australian schoolboys.
 
Ajantha Jayatunga
Ajantha Jayatunga captained the college Badminton team and was also was a prominent member of the Hockey team. He was a key contributor in winning the all island schools Badminton champions in the early seventies and was a member of the Sri Lankan pool as well. He later joined the Colombo University and
Ajantha Jayatunga
played Sara Trophy Cricket.
In 1969 at a cricket match between Royal and Ananda which was played at Nalanda College Grounds Ajantha had to eat “bitter pie” by trying to lead a cheering squad forgetting he was in Maradana. The writers were also in the squad and ran for their dear lives. Ajantha is now a vascular surgeon in the United Kingdom.